Monthly Archives: August 2014

A Harvest Celebration

A couple of weeks ago, our garden started showing definite signs of seasonal maturity, many plants were in full bloom, some others were steadily producing fruit, while a few, like the lettuces, had already called it quits. One very interesting group were those of the onion and garlic family, which after putting out their funky looking flowers were begging to be pulled out of the ground. It was time for a harvest party!

My two special guests were M and B, both 7 years old.  B you may remember from her internship last year, when she helped me by taking care of the garden (B Is The New Farmer In Charge.  and  Meet B Our Interim Farmer), and also  when she planted all the garlic bulbs (Planting Our 2014 Garlic Crop). I met M last fall, he is a member of the track team where I assist coaching. M is a great kid with a happy face and a curious mind, much like B.IMG_2173

I had thought of bringing B back to harvest the garlic she had planted, as a way for her to see the result of her work last fall. In conversation with M’s mom, I learned he had shown recent interest in gardening, so I thought he would perhaps also enjoy spending an afternoon picking fruit and veggies, and learning about worms, bees and where some of the food comes from.

It was a great afternoon, the stage was our garden, and mother nature set it up perfectly for us to find amazing goodies in every corner. We started by emptying out one of the soft containers where I grew potatoes. B and M had fun digging with their hands through the soft soil in the wheelbarrow looking for nice bright red potatoes.IMG_2140 IMG_2136 IMG_2141 IMG_2177 From there we moved to the zucchinis, tomatoes, and cucumbers searching for fruit ready to be picked. With amazement, they pulled carrots from the ground, and also picked beans from the vines.IMG_2144IMG_2146 IMG_2149

We stopped to look how the baby cantaloupes and water melons were forming, and made sure to smell some of the herbs growing. At the far end of our garden we found cabbages, onions and a small forest of garlic plants to pick from.IMG_2157

IMG_2165 IMG_2169We finished work by digging through a compost pile usually frequented by sub-foot long night crawlers to see who could find the biggest worm, and later took a look at how the worms in our worm farm recycle some of our kitchen waste.IMG_2175

It was a great afternoon, we gave the children bags to put in all their goodies to take home, and B proudly commented “I don’t eat any of this stuff…I am just taking it home for my family”. I often think how interesting it would be to include gardening as part of the elementary school curriculum, children could learn so much by getting their fingers back into the soil.  IMG_2153 IMG_2136 IMG_2158

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Paper? or plastic?

During the winter I became interested in a planting technique used to stimulate plants to grow  extensive root systems. The benefits of this technique translate into stronger plants that are better able to utilize the nutrients in the soil they live in.  The technique is known as root air pruning.

Root air pruning occurs in containers made out of materials that allow the roots to enter in contact with air once they reach the container walls.    At such point of contact  the tip of the root dehydrates and dies. However, the plant compensates by growing secondary roots in other directions inside the container. As these secondary roots further develop, and in turn come in contact with the container wall at a different spot, the process is repeated. The end result is a very well developed, very dense root system inside the container, as opposed to the single root that circles around and around and becomes pot bound inside a traditional container . There are many commercially available root air pruning containers, and perhaps just as many DIY suggestions available on line, (I particularly enjoy watching Larry Hall’s videos ).

Since this year I was using raised beds which limited the space we have available to grow vegetables, I decided to experiment growing zucchini in root air pruning containers, to gain the precious gardening real estate in the raised beds that would otherwise be occupied by the giant summer squash plants. I initially made four large containers (17 gal each) to house my zucchini seedlings. I made the containers by sewing heavy duty landscape fabric into a 16″X16″X16″ square-bottomed bags, which I then filled about 1/2 of the way up with the same soil (Mel’s Mix) I used in my raised beds. IMG_3377

Early enough it could be noted that the bags were doing a good job, the seedlings were growing strong and healthy with the extra heat they were getting in the dark containers. At that point I decided to try growing potatoes, so I made three more bags for that purpose, and I also made a long sausage like container which I planted with watercress seed, lettuce and celery.IMG_3502

Soon after  I though to make a few smaller bags out of the material trimmed off when making the original larger bags.IMG_3484 IMG_3485

I made a dozen 4gal bags, where I planted our squash, melon and water melon seed. The bags were great for starting seed because they could be closed at the top and provide a dark, warm and humid environment for germination  while at the same time preventing squirrels and other critters from getting too curious and messing everything up.IMG_3488 IMG_3487 IMG_3492IMG_3744IMG_3743

To date, the 4 zucchini plants have produced almost 8lbs of food so far. We had some degree of success growing potatoes, and after emptying the bags we have already re purposed them to grow pumpkin, sweet potatoes and carrot. IMG_4418 IMG_4541

Our sausage shaped container is going strong and we still take cuttings of watercress and celery as needed. Our melons, squash and cantaloupe look awesome and we already have some fruit forming.IMG_3676 IMG_4326 IMG_3569 IMG_4416 IMG_4317IMG_4594IMG_4592

These containers are so versatile, that I have also made 1/2 gal bags to root perennial herbs to share with friends, I am sure this size will also work great to start seedlings next spring. The bags are great for gardeners with limited land, for apartment dwellers with just a balcony, or even to use in areas that cannot be easily converted into gardens (patios, decks, lawns,etc). Next year I plan on expanding our bag farm to grow  plants in a sunnier location of our yard, and to re-locate lettuce to a shadier area once the mercury starts climbing… the possibilities are endless.

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