B is the new farmer in charge

So we are finally getting ready to leave on vacation to beautiful New Hampshire and Maine. We have made plans for months in anticipation of this moment, having changed them quite a few times. I checked tons of websites and trail books, read dozens of trip reviews and watched quite a few videos to figure out how to best spend the few days we take off every summer.  I have spent many nights tracing possible trails and selecting daily destinations. This year we chose to combine hiking, kayaking and camping. With this in mind, I made lists of equipment we’d need on every leg of the trip, gathered most of it from our basement, custom built a few things to out rig our boats, and ordered whatever else we did not have but was on the list. Certainly if half of the fun is getting there, preparing for it is got to be at least a quarter.

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Throughout all this preparation, the thought of leaving my garden in the middle of the summer was constantly on my mind. After all it is the middle of production. We are getting a few pounds of tomatoes every day, the peppers are ready to be collected, every couple of days one or two eggplants are ready to eat, and all my seedlings still need to be watched to guarantee harvesting in the early fall. I did the best I could at increasing irrigation intervals to prevent a bake like it happened when we went away for a few days in early July. My main concern was “Who would be picking the fruit?”. We definitely do not want it to rot or go to waste.

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That is when B came to mind. I recalled she had offered to help me with my garden a few weeks ago. At the time I had offered to go pick her up and bring her over, but she declined because I did not have a booster seat in my car. B is my colleague’s daughter. She a  very bright 6 year old with beautiful brown eyes and an engaging personality. Who better than her  to take care of the place while we are gone?

Her appointment as farm tomato picker was sent to her  as a text  through her mom. B, jumped, danced and hollered “woohooo” as she was read that she had been chosen from among “hundreds of applicants”. That afternoon, she came to my house to learn the ropes and take the reigns of my “farm”. We met at the curb, and she skipped all the way from there to the backyard, stopping only to say hi to my wife Beth half way up. Once there we took time to touch and smell all the herbs, the scents and names of plants were all so new to her. She saw where the carrots are growing, and of course we spent some time picking cherry tomatoes, one of which she tasted but not liked. She learned that to pick eggplants you grab the fruit, not the prickly stem, and that some peppers can be very hot. She tasted fresh broccoli, and managed to walk in between narrowly planted rows of seedlings with some grace (this was the hardest thing for her, so this morning I planted a stick with orange blazing tape next to each seedling so she can see better where they are). Of all the things B got to try, I think watering the plants was the most fun, especially when we turned the hose in rain mode and she could get her head wet too.

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B’s short training visit yesterday made me somewhat wish I was not leaving so soon. Not because I am afraid she will not take good care, nor because I am going to miss my garden terribly while hiking or paddling through some amazing wilderness. I guess I wish I could spend more time showing her fun things, like how cucumber plants lash on to things, or why flowers attract bees, or just how to name a few plants or birds. I am sure we will have a chance in the future to do some gardening together. This is her week to explore and to be the farmer in charge. With an attitude like hers, she can only succeed. Hopefully next post we will have some of B’s gardening photos.

Do you share your garden experience with your children? What intrigues children the most in a garden? When do your children start joining you in the garden?

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